Pesticide Licensing
Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Regulations are set to take effect in British Columbia on July 1st of this year. We think this is a good thing for the golf industry as it allows continued use of applications on the golf course under regulations. It does not eliminate all chemicals or fungicides from being used for the betterment of your golf course.

IPM
Under the Minister’s regulation five classes of pesticides have been established. From the website it reads as follows:

(a) permit-restricted pesticides, being those pesticides assigned to this class under section 43 (1) [classification of pesticides] because the administrator considers that the risk of unreasonable adverse effects from their use should be evaluated for each proposed use;

(b) restricted pesticides, being those pesticides that

  • (i) are required under the federal Act to be labeled with the product class designation “RESTRICTED”, and
  • (ii) are not permit-restricted pesticides or excluded pesticides;

(c) commercial pesticides, being those pesticides that

  • (i) are required under the federal Act to bear a label indicating their product class designation acceptable under that Act in relation to their general uses in commercial activities that are specified on the label as “commercial”, “industrial”, “agricultural” or another commercial activity, and
  • (ii) are not permit-restricted pesticides or excluded pesticides;

(d) domestic pesticides, being those pesticides

  • (i) that
    • (A) are required under the federal Act to be labeled with the product class designation “DOMESTIC”, and
    • (B) are not permit-restricted pesticides or excluded pesticides, or
  • (ii) that are contained in a fertilizer registered under the Fertilizers Act (Canada);

(e) excluded pesticides, being those pesticides assigned to this class under section 43 (2) [classification of pesticides] because the administrator considers that excluding them from compliance with the requirements imposed on a licensee, permit holder or confirmation holder under the Act will not increase the risk of unreasonable adverse effects from their use.

[am. B.C. Reg. 258/2006, s. 2.]

Golf courses are classified as intending to use pesticides on a “non-service” basis. This means that pesticides are applied to land you own or manage.

Read the full details of the regulations here including licenses, permits, notices and reporting.

IPM License
Licenses are required for pesticide application. The license application can be found on the government of BC’s website.

There was a great document posted on Twitter today to assist golf courses in filling out the license application. It was posted by BC Golf Course Superintendent Greg Austin and written by Keith Lyall BC Golf Course Superintendent and the EAC Committee.

You can view their step by step document here.

We, Jeff & Tara Ciecko of CK Golf write two blogs, one is our 19th Hole Blog where we share personal experiences and the other an Industry Blog where we comment on general business and internet marketing best practices, sales strategies and give golf industry related opinions. We have owned CK Golf  for 9 years and provide marketing, social media and business services to the golf and other industries. Our 19th Hole Blog is about the places we visit and the things we do. When we say that we like or dislike something or have a good or bad experience this is our opinion and the truth as we see it, not something we have been paid for. If you have any questions or comments feel free to contact us anytime.